Dale seeks advice on presidency from students

Presidential candidate Elizabeth Dale talks with freshman Brook Tracy. Photo by Shamira McCray • mccrays@mytjnow.com

Presidential candidate Elizabeth Dale talks with freshman Brook Tracy. Photo by Shamira McCray • mccrays@mytjnow.com

While having a glass of Coke, Elizabeth Dale, a presidential finalist, mingled with Winthrop students during common time at Thomson Cafe. With hopes of receiving advice from students that would help support her role as President DiGiorgio’s successor, Dale was able to get a sense of what students expect to see the most from a new president.

“I’m asking students what they like about Winthrop for advice if I’m elected,” she said to a group of students Thursday.

Originally from Northern New Jersey, Dale said if elected, her first task as president would be “to listen, to get to know the students, the faculty and the staff.” She said would establish regular office hours so students could come to her with any concerns on a regular basis.

Having been initially recruited to apply for the presidential position instead of applying through initial willingness, Dale said after researching the school she “decided it would be a good fit.”

Austin McDonald, a junior integrated marketing communication major, said he would like the next president of Winthrop University to be more visible on campus.

“I know DiGiorgio’s busy, but to see the president on campus means a lot,” McDonald said.

In regards to Dale, McDonald said he liked that she was “nice” and the next president needs to be someone whose vibe is “energetic and matches that of the student’s.”

Josh Wald, a freshman music major, was another student who had nice words to say about the presidential finalist.

“I really like that she already has plans for the future if she won the presidency,” Wald said.

As for funding, Dale said if she becomes the next president she would like to work with alumni to develop a scholarship fund for students.

“My motto would be students first,” Dale said.

Students such as McDonald would love to have a football team at Winthrop although the idea is a “far reach.” Howerver, according to Dale, she would consider the idea of developing a football team under on circumstance.

“I would think a football team would be about $30 million,” Dale said. If the resources were available and someone would write that check, I would consider it.

The search for Winthrop’s 10th president is still underway.